Aviso a personas planeando visitar Cuba y para aquellas que han visitado la isla recientemente. Por Marta Menor.

AVISO A PERSONAS PLANEANDO VISITAR CUBA Y PARA AQUELLAS QUE HAN VISITADO LA ISLA RECIENTEMENTE

Según el Gobierno Cubano, las últimas pruebas mostraron que Pollán sufría de una infección en los riñones “pequeña y no alarmante”, según Labrada, y un caso activo de dengue, una enfermedad transmitida por mosquitos y por estos días frecuente en La Habana.

Según el Centro para el Control y la Prevención de Enfermedades la fiebre del dengue hemorrágico es una infección grave y potencialmente mortal que se propaga por medio de ciertas especies de mosquitos.  Debido a que la fiebre del dengue hemorrágico es causada por un virus para el cual no se conoce cura ni vacuna, sólo es posible el tratamiento de los síntomas.

Estos síntomas van seguidos de un estado parecido al shock.  El sangrado puede aparecer como manchas de sangre pequeñas sobre la piel (petequias) y parches de sangre más grandes bajo la piel (equimosis). Las lesiones menores pueden causar sangrado. El shock puede causar la muerte.
Turistas planeando visitar la isla de Cuba, deben de tener en cuenta la posibilidad de contraer denguue que puede resultar en fiebre hemoráagica  lo que  podría ocasionar la muerte si no es tratada propiamente.

Todos aquellos con planes de visitar la isla deben de tomar precauciones para evitar contraer el dengue.  Aquellos que han visitado la isla recientemente, y manifiestan síntomas de fiebre, dolores de cabeza, dolor detrás de los ojos, dolores muculares, náuseas, deben de ver a sus médicos inmediatamente y dejarles saber que han visitado Cuba recientemente para recibir tratamiento adecuado.

Les dejo estas informaciones importantes.

Marta Menor.

Outbreak Notice
Update: Dengue in Tropical and Subtropical Regions

This information is current as of today, October 15, 2011 at 11:51 EDT

Updated: September 15, 2011

Situation Information

Dengue fever is the most common cause of fever in travelers returning from the Caribbean, Central America, and South Central Asia.1 Dengue is reported commonly from most tropical and subtropical countries of Oceania, Asia, the Caribbean, the Americas, and occasionally Africa. This disease is caused by four similar viruses (DENV-1, -2, -3, and -4) and is spread through the bites of infected mosquitoes.

Dengue virus (DENV) transmission occurs in both rural and urban areas; however, dengue infections are most often reported from urban settings. For the most up-to-date information on dengue worldwide, see the Dengue Map on the CDC website.

The Americas and the Caribbean

As of August 5, 2011, more than 890,000 cases have been reported to the Pan American Health Organization (PAHO) during 2011, including 10,840 cases of dengue hemorrhagic fever (DHF) and/or dengue shock syndrome (DSS). Several countries across the region are reporting high incidence rates, including Brazil, Paraguay, Bolivia, the Bahamas, and Aruba.

Advice for Travelers

Travelers can reduce their risk of infection with dengue fever by protecting themselves from mosquito bites. The mosquitoes that spread dengue usually bite at dusk and dawn but may bite at any time during the day, especially indoors, in shady areas, or when the weather is cloudy.
Travelers should follow the steps below to protect themselves from mosquito bites:
Where possible, stay in hotels or resorts that are well screened or air conditioned and that take measures such as spraying with insecticide to reduce the mosquito population.
When outdoors or in a building that is not well screened, use insect repellent on uncovered skin. If sunscreen is needed, apply before applying insect repellent. Look for a repellent that contains one of the following active ingredients: DEET, picaridin (KBR 3023), Oil of Lemon Eucalyptus/PMD, or IR3535. Always follow the instructions on the label when you use the repellent.
In general, repellents protect longer against mosquito bites when they have a higher concentration (percentage) of any of these active ingredients. However, concentrations above 50% do not offer a marked increase in protection time. Products with less than 10% of an active ingredient may offer only limited protection, often no longer than 1-2 hours.
The American Academy of Pediatrics approves the use of repellents with up to 30% DEET on children more than 2 months old.
Protect babies less than 2 months old by using a carrier draped with mosquito netting with an elastic edge for a tight fit. For more information about the use of repellent on infants and children, please see the “Insect and Other Arthropod Protection” section in Traveling Safely with Infants and Children and the “Children” section of CDC’s Frequently Asked Questions about Repellent Use.
For more information on the use of insect repellents, see the information on the Mosquito and Tick Protection webpage.

Wear loose, long-sleeved shirts and long pants when outdoors. For greater protection, clothing may also be sprayed with a repellent containing permethrin or another EPA-registered repellent. (Remember: don’t use permethrin on skin.)

Symptoms and Treatment

Symptoms of dengue include:
fever
severe headache
pain behind the eyes
joint and muscle pain
rash
nausea/vomiting
hemorrhagic (bleeding) manifestations

Usually dengue fever causes a mild illness, but it can be severe and lead to dengue hemorrhagic fever (DHF), which can be fatal if not treated. People who have previously been infected with dengue fever are more at risk of getting severe dengue.

No vaccine is available to prevent dengue, and there is no specific medicine to cure illness caused by dengue. Those who become ill with dengue fever can be given medicine to reduce fever, such as acetaminophen, and may need oral rehydration or intravenous fluids and, in severe cases, treatment to support their blood pressure. Aspirin (acetylsalicylic acid), aspirin-containing drugs, and other nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (e.g., ibuprofen) should be avoided because of the possibility of bleeding. Early recognition and treatment of severe dengue (e.g., signs and symptoms consistent with impending blood pressure failure) can reduce the risk of death.

If you return from a trip abroad and get sick with a fever, you should seek medical care right away. Be sure to tell the doctor or other health care provider about your recent travel.

Information for Health Care Providers

Proper diagnosis of dengue is important, as many other diseases may mimic dengue. Health care providers should consider dengue, malaria, (in south Asia and countries bordering the Indian Ocean,) chikungunya, and leptosporiasis depending on the itinerary and exposure in the differential diagnosis of patients who have fever and a history of travel to tropical areas during the 2 weeks before symptom onset.
See the Clinical & Laboratory Guidance on the CDC Dengue website for information about reporting dengue cases and instructions for specimen shipping. Serum samples obtained for viral identification and serologic diagnosis can be sent through state or territorial health departments to:
CDC Dengue Branch
Division of Vector-Borne Infectious Diseases
National Center for Emerging and Zoonotic Infectious Diseases (Proposed)
1324 Calle Cañada
San Juan, Puerto Rico 00920-3860
Telephone: 787-706-2399; fax, 787-706-2496

Una respuesta para “Aviso a personas planeando visitar Cuba y para aquellas que han visitado la isla recientemente. Por Marta Menor.”

  1. QUIEN MATO A LAURA POLLAN ES UN VIRUS QUE AZOTA LA ISLA DE CUBA POR MAS DE 5 DECADAS,SE LLAMA CASTROIDES,HASTA AHORA NO HAY VACUNA, NI CUARA, SOLO TRATAMIENTO(MUY DEBIL Y PACIVO,POR NO DECIR PENDEJO) ESPORADICO DE ALGUNOS ELEMENTOIDES SOCIALISTOIDES.DICHO VIRUS FUE IMPORTADO DE RUSISTOIDES STALINISTA,SE RECOMIENDA LEJANIA COMO PREVENCION.ELIO ESQUIVEL.

Deja un comentario